Sketchbook
March 1961 American Modeler

March 1961 American Modeler

March 1961 American ModelerTable of Contents

These pages from vintage modeling magazines like American Aircraft Modeler, American Modeler, Air Trails, Flying Aces, Flying Models, Model Airplane News, & Young Men captured the era. I will be glad to scan articles for you. All copyrights hereby acknowledged.

sink-me

Sketchbook

To facilitate scaling up model plans, Robert Williams, Jr., Hazleton, Pa., draws scale grid on clear plastic, scores scratches, smears on black shoe polish, wipes off excess.

Handy makeshift bench vise for holding sheet metal parts is actually a flat hinge, screwed to edge of work table. Screw in center tightens "jaws" on work, says C. M. Robertson, Ont., Canada.

30 lb. monofiliament fishing line cemented to leading edge of indoor glider wing before shaping makes tough reinforcement; serves as sanding guide. Idea by E. E. Wolfe, Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

North Miami Beach, Fla., modeler, Bob Whitney, sends neat deal for rat racer automatic rudder tab. Rubber tension holds offset at low speed; centrifugal force on weight straightens tab later.

Harry Murphy, Jr., Anderson, Ind., makes precise on-the-field "wash-in" or "wash-out" wing adjustments by pinning or cementing lengths of TE stock to trailing edge of wing. Length determines effectiveness.

Vernon Van Diver, Jr., Woolford, Md., puts Styrofoam to good use in model wing construction. Thin spruce cap spars are spaced with foam blocks for greatly increased rigidity and strength.

Special hole-cutting tool devised by E. Ceisel, Northfield, Ill., is used to cut holes in ribs or formers of completed wing or fuselage. Cutting wire part can be bent to change diameter.

Addition of wire hook to starting cord when used with bottle cap makes starting model engine quick and easy. Hook latches over trailing edge of prop. Submitted by Robert Moragne, Baker, Ore.

Got a new idea for construction. adjustment or operation of model planes, boats or R/C? "AM" pays $10 for each "hint & kink" used. Send rough sketch and description to Sketchbook, c/o American Modeler, 575 Madison Ave., New York 22, N. Y. Please note that because of the very large number of submissions, none can be returned to the sender.

Sketchbook Editions
| Jan 52 | Jul 54 | Aug 54 | Sep 54 | Dec 54 | Mar 55 | Jan 57 | Feb 57 | Mar 57 | Apr 57 | May 57 | Jun 57 | Jul 57 | Sep 57 | Oct 57 | Nov 57 | Dec 57 | Oct 58 | Mar 59 | Jul 59 | Aug 59 |Nov 59 | Dec 59 | Jan 61 | Feb 61 | Mar 61 | Apr 61 | Jul 61 | Aug 61 | Dec 61 | Mar 62 | Jan 62 |Feb 62 | Jun 62 | Jul 62 | Oct 62 | Sep 62 | Dec 62 | Jan/Feb 63 | Mar/Apr 63 | May/Jun 63 |Jul/Aug 63 | Sep/Oct 63 | Nov/Dec 63 | Mar 67 | Oct 67 | Feb 68 | Apr 68 | May 68 | Jun 68 | Jul 68 | Sep 68 |

Back when the Sketchbook, Gadgetry, Powerless Pointers, and Engine Info columns were run, there were very few pre-built models, and there simply was not as much available in the way of hardware and specialized modeling tools. We were still a nation of designers and builders. The workforce was full of people who worked on production lines, built houses and buildings with hand tools, and did not have distractions like Nintendos and X-Boxes. Remember that plastics were not common material until the early 50s and the transistor wasn't invented until late 47. Enjoy the tips. Some of you will no doubt wax nostalgic over the methods, since you can remember the days when you did the exact same thing!

 

 

Posted